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Gingrich Blasts Trump's Tweets: 'Totally Misplaced'

Republican Former House Speaker Newt GingrichRepublican Former House Speaker Newt Gingrich

Although a supporter of President Donald Trump in the past, former House Speaker Newt Gingrich staunchly defended Senate Majority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky against the president's attacks.

On Aug. 10, Trump tweeted: "Can you believe that Mitch McConnell, who has screamed Repeal & Replace for 7 years, couldn't get it done."

In response, Gingrich said, "I think it's totally misplaced." He made his remarks on Aug. 11 appearance on the "Laura Ingraham Show," according to The Hill.

"And furthermore, McConnell's going to still be there," Gingrich told the conservative radio host. "You don't pick a fight with a teammate, and they're not going to replace McConnell. And so I don't understand what the president thinks he's accomplishing."

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The president previously criticized McConnell for his inability as Senate majority leader to pass legislation to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare.

The former member of Congress expressed his belief that the president recognizes his own involvement in the lawmaking process.

"He talks about how Mitch has to get this done -- well, this is a team," continued Gingrich. "The president is a key member of the team. You could argue he's the leader of the team, so if things aren't working, maybe, he needs to take part of the ownership here."

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Some Republican senators allied with Gingrich's defense of McConnell, many of whom see the repeal and replace campaign as a group effort.

"Passing POTUS's legislative agenda requires a team effort," read an Aug. 11 Tweet by Republican Sen. John Cornyn of Texas. ​"No one is more qualified than Mitch McConnell to lead Senate in that effort."

GOP consultant Whit Ayres sided with Republicans in Congress, noting that in-fighting could have potentially negative ramifications for achieving the party's policy agenda.

"No one can succeed alone," said Ayres. "Attacking members of your own team has never been known to be an effective strategy to produce victories."

Contrary to many in Washington, D.C., Trump's base supporters have voiced support of the president's antics targeting the Senate majority leader.

"The overarching theme from coast to coast was that people wanted to take a wrecking ball to Washington and they were hopeful that Donald Trump would be elected and would be that wrecking ball," said Jenny Beth Martin, a co-founder of the Tea Party Patriots.

Conservative strategist Keith Appell noted that many of Trump's supporters are particularly aggravated because the GOP effort to repeal and replace Obamacare pre-dates the Trump administration.

"Trump is expressing the frustration that is felt at the grassroots," said Appell. "This is exactly what people hate about Washington: the promises over and over to do something positive if you just give us your money and give us your votes and give us your volunteers. Then, when they get elected, they don't do it." 

Sources: Donald J. Trump/TwitterThe Hill (2) / Featured Image: Gage Skidmore/Flickr / Embedded Images: Gage Skidmore/Flickr (2)