Society

Barbra Streisand Claims Hillary Lost For One Reason And One Reason Only

Actress and performer Barbra Streisand has spoken out about Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's loss in the 2016 presidential election to Donald Trump, saying "strong women have always been suspect."

"Women are still so underestimated," Streisand said in an interview with WYNC, according to Page Six. "It's incredible to watch even this last election with Hillary, the kind of strong woman, the powerful woman, the educated woman, the experienced woman, being thought of as the other, or too elite, or too educated."

Streisand, a supporter of Clinton during her campaign, had previously appeared at several fundraising events for the candidate, and has previously spoken out against Trump.

"It's very, very odd to me, and it was heartbreaking for her to lose," said Streisand, who also said that "power and women has always been suspect. Strong women have always been suspect ... in this country."

In the 2016 election, Clinton did better with women overall than Trump, gaining 54 percent of female voters, while Trump took 42 percent, according to Vox. The Republican did better than Clinton with white women -- Trump won 53 percent of white female voters, and beat Clinton among white female voters without college degrees by 27 points.

"There has long been a misconception that women voters vote by their gender identity instead of their party," said Rutgers University's Kelly Dittmar. "To try to talk about women as a single voting bloc, but to neglect to look at the crosstabs, to neglect to look at the differences in race, age, education, creates this false shock."

In comparison, more than 90 percent of black college-educated female voters voted for Clinton, as well as 95 percent of black female voters without college degrees.

Trump campaign manager Kellyanne Conway said that the crux of the 2016 election was "between what offends you and what affects you."

"Voters were being told constantly, 'Stare at this, care about this, make this the deal-breaker once and for all,'" Conway said. "And they were told that five or six times a week about different things. And yet they went, they voted the way voters have always voted: on things that affect them, not just things that offend them."

Kathy Dolan, a political science professor from the University of Wisconsin Milwaukee, suggested that a candidate's gender may not matter much for voters.

"All of the evidence we actually have from elections in which women candidates run against men is that people vote for the candidate of their political party," said Dolan.

Sources: Page SixVox / Photo credit: Lifescript/Flickr

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